Who let the chooks out?

Trish, the lady who ably takes care of and trains (i) my cat when I need to be absent from home, is presently minding a property not far from Dismal Swamp. The owners are away for a couple of weeks, leaving their seven Ragdoll cats (ii), assorted chickens and chicks, a large garden and yard for Trish to manage. After being there for a couple of hours and trailing along after her as she did the chores, I came home a weary person!

I have rallied enough to post a few photos of the livestock. I ate all of the fresh vegetables I scored from the garden, so you’ll just have to use your imagination there.

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These are Guinea Fowl chicks, lovingly foster-mothered by these clucky hens.

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The Guinea Fowl chicks are fed a mix of mince meat, cooked rice and hard boiled eggs. The latter ingredient must give them an early start on cannibalism, perhaps.

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The chooks have plenty of room to prowl around, once they are released from their hen house. They benefit from fresh vegetables from the garden.

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The hen in the foreground is a right bossy britches, who bullies the rest of the flock, including the rooster.

Although there are seven cats in the house, only one could be found, and deigned to pose for a milli-second.

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Now, I get to do footnotes.  Just like university days again.

(i)    it doesn’t take me long to undo all the good training Trish has done with Minx.

(ii)  yes, that’s seven Ragdoll cats, and they all live indoors. They have one of those catios built onto the side of the house, so they can get fresh air and exercise out there.

This image from a Google search show the undeniable adorableness of this breed of cat.

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26 Comments

Filed under Australia

26 responses to “Who let the chooks out?

  1. Just for the record….I had no idea what “chooks” were but guessed (like I do with Italian sometimes) by the context and the pictures. When we had them in suburban Los Angeles, CA (when it was still legal in the 1950’s) I think they are what we called “chicks” but chicks were usually the baby ones.

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  2. Hello Yvonne, you just bumped my stats a bit. Thank you. If I keep reading will I find out where you live and what you do? Or will I have to start learning Cryptic? I always let my chooks out. That is a clue because I don’t think everyone in the world understand ‘chook’.

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  3. Andante

    All cats are delightful! We’ve never yet met one that isn’t. As we type this, one of ours is “helping” – all over the keyboard, so any mistakes are her, not us! For us the worst thing about going away on holiday is that the cats have to go into a cattery – even though we’ve got a good one, we miss them something rotten.

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    • Those darn little animals sure wind themselves around our hearts, don’t they? Do your cats cope OK at the cattery? It’s probably like a cat resort for them with pampering on demand.

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  4. Catio! LOL! I’d never heard that before, but it makes sense 😉

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  5. That’s called recycling Yvonne. Chook lays egg, eats egg, lays egg ………
    It’s a Climate, eco, save a tree thing 😉 xox ❤

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  6. Wow, that sounds like a really fun day! I had no idea the chicks eat hard boiled eggs.

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  7. joanneh

    Well the chickens look nice and healthy and at least she knows where her eggs come from. The cat is just being a cat. Try feeding about 40+ cows, 11 horses, 3 barn cats who would rather lap of cream than hunt the mice
    2 yard dogs and one house dog 2x a day……………….

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  8. I hope the fox is not near cause; ‘when the boss is away and the chooks dance on the table’. etc.

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  9. I thought you were going to say that you ate all the livestock – I was like ‘man, this post is grim…’ 🙂

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  10. With all the other Australian wildlife I imagine those little ones need to learn to be cannibals. Hope they run fast.

    And of course the cat is adorable. But then I find all cats adorable.

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    • They can already fly really well, I was quite impressed with the little things. There are plenty of predators lurking in the rainforest around the property, so they’ll need to be on the alert when they’re let loose.

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  11. I don’t think I’d like to do that job.

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