Dorsoduro 3429-30

This is another of the buildings featured in Venetian domestic architecture (Egle Trincanato, Renzo Salvadori)

Those familiar with Campo Santa Margherita will surely have noticed it as they walked toward Campo San Pantalon.

There used to be 6 of the stone balconies you see on the sides of the building. Somewhere along the line, modifications were made to one of them on the right hand side, to make a second large window.

 

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This is a statue of Santa Margherita, from the 15th century. It was previously to be found in the church of the same name, which no longer exists.

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At first glance, the facade looks quite plain, but then you’ll notice so many little features to capture your eyes. Enjoy a spritz, or the drink of your choice, and study this building, next time you’re in this campo.

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28 Comments

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28 responses to “Dorsoduro 3429-30

  1. Didn’t they block up a lot of doorways and windows because of taxes imposed, like they did in England Yvonne? Just wondering.

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    • Thank you! It was a very overcast day, so the photos came out a tad flat. I noticed some photos from Venice on your site, I’ll go back for a proper look. How are the studies going?

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  2. Caroline

    Some friends stayed a few times in a holiday flat in this building, until the noise of the movida became too much. It’s not clear in your photos but there is a washing line strung along the front of the building (or maybe it’s only there in summer), and we have seen people apparently taking pictures of their pants! (Or rather, one would hope, actually the architectural details 🙂 )

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    • I’ll bet it gets mighty noisy at night!

      You’re right, when you click on the photo, you can see the clotheslines on 2 of the levels. There were no pants visible on that particular day. 🙂

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  3. Thanks for the info & photos! Campo Santa Margherita is my ‘home’ campo: near where I’ve always lived, grocery shopped, ate pizza and drank wine or coffee. I always love looking at it!

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  4. It’s that 42 x’s zoom lens and tiny screen for viewing on the camera.
    Architectural details do that too. Lots of surprises later.

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  5. And my comment should have said “begin to show up”. I’m sitting in the wrong position for typing. Where’s your comment edit button, Y?

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  6. Andrew

    I have looked at this many times and always thought that was San Teodoro with his dragon! She looks a bit beardy. How wrong could I be.I also like the way the drain pipes are arranged.

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    • We need the volunteer cleaners to get up there and give her a good scrub, to get rid of that beard, Andrew! I like how she seems to be clutching at that loose wire.

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  7. You certainly wouldn’t see all the decorative bits, if you didn’t take the time to really look at the building.

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  8. ps…I always marvel at the modifications that are made to the buildings….very interesting. I wish I could stand around and listen to the discussions as the decisions were made.
    “But dear, Giovanni needs more light in his bedroom to study”
    “let’s block up this pesky doorway….or make it a meter lower”
    ……

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    • Thanks to Bert, we have an explanation of that creature, Linda. Take some opera glasses with you, next time you’re in this campo.

      Isn’t it true, any modifications would not be entered into lightly, with those elderly buildings!

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  9. Yvonne….I can’t figure out what the animal is at Christ’s feet…..strange…..

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  10. Bert

    I like the legend of Sta Margherita. … while she was in prison she had an encounter with the devil in the form of a dragon. According to the legend, he swallowed her, but the cross she carried in her hand so irritated his throat that he was forced to disgorge her (she is patroness of childbirth).
    Yeah, throwing up is just like childbirth. Another tale ends … What is said here about the beast swallowing Margaret then bursting open is regarded as apocryphal and not to be considered the truth. That’s a relief!

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