Italy’s Got The Voice, and Florence’s Got Knockers

Have you seen this rockin’ nun? There’s going to be an upsurge in applicants for the nunneries, I reckon.

Meanwhile, Florence has plenty of knockers! Who knew? So, just to trot out a modest sample of one to whet your appetite. *

Firenze 224

Firenze 223

Firenze 222

* Here is the educational portion of this post:

This phrase is often confused with ‘wet your whistle’. Uncertainty about the spelling of the first word, either as whet or wet, leads to both phrases being wrongly spelled too. In fact there’s no connection between the two terms, which are properly spelled as ‘whet your appetite’ and ‘wet your whistle’. Whet your appetiteThe allusion in the former is to the sharpening of tools on a whetstone (grindstone) and to whet means just to sharpen. So, ‘whetting our appetite’ is ‘sharpening our appetite’.

‘Wet your whistle’ predates ‘whet your appetite’ by some centuries, and was first recorded in the 1386 Towneley Mysteries:

“Had She oones Wett Hyr Whystyll She couth Syng full clere Hyr pater noster.”

Whistle here means throat or voice and the phrase just means ‘take a drink’.

Advertisements

23 Comments

Filed under Firenze, Florence

23 responses to “Italy’s Got The Voice, and Florence’s Got Knockers

  1. I also love the little knockers on various doors in Venezia – some of them are very clever!
    But not as clever as your knockers Yvonne!
    HA!
    Bridget

    Like

  2. Hi Florence 😀 Need I say more ? Ralph xox ❤

    Like

  3. Susie L

    You have some beautiful knockers Y! I love the clip of Sister Cristina, what wonderful energy she has!

    Like

    • Sister Cristina and her fellow nuns do seem to have energy and rhythm, Susie.

      I was quietly happy to find lots of knockers in Florence; why hadn’t I noticed them before?

      Like

  4. Bert

    I think Michelle is thinking of Soeur Sourire, who sang “Dominique”. You can refresh your memory on Youtube (of course). She may have sung “Frère Jacques”, the French lullaby, but I haven’t found a trace of it.

    Like

    • Well, Bert we have a saying here that if you remember the 60’s you weren’t there. I was there but very young and the sisters were teaching us “Frere Jacques” so I’m sure I got them confused.
      Unfortunately my keyboard does not allow for accents, etc. for foreign languages. But obviously you knew who I meant.

      Like

    • This morning, while feeding the cat(s), I was humming “Dominique”, for some strange reason. Then I came to the computer and read this thread of comments. I do remember the Singing Nun, Michelle and Bert, and have just been reading about her on the always ever so reliable Wikipedia. 🙂 She had quite a life.

      Like

  5. fabulous knockers! and I enjoyed this mornings lesson on whet and wet – I had no idea this is what it meant so thank you! 😀

    Like

  6. Maybe she should have been a singer instead of a nun!

    Like

  7. Here, try this link, or just search for Sister Cristina Scuccia, she’s really something!

    Oh, and your “Like” was registered.

    Like

    • Some of us remember a very popular “Singing Nun” who was the hit of the airwaves….I’m thinking mid 1960’s. Anyone besides me (and you Y) old enough to remember “Frere Jacque”?
      On the second try WordPress allowed me to like ….but not comment….and then on the third try it brought up the video.

      Like

  8. Love those knockers!
    The video wouldn’t open for me ….but at least WordPress is letting me comment (maybe). But of course I couldn’t “like”…at least not right now. Is it me or is it WordPress? Who knows.
    I also love the educational component.

    Like

Now it's your turn

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s