It’s not very far from number 2761, but in which sestiere?

This will give you some practice in finding where this  might be located, using this site: http://venicexplorer.net/index.php?hlangs=en

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Once you’re in the site, select Venice Civic Number from the list on the left side. This will bring you to a screen with Cannaregio as your first choice. (The others proceed alphabetically, followed by Giudecca, Lido and the lagoon islands.)

When you enter the number 2761, you will be given the name of any calle, corte, etc.,  bearing the number. In Cannaregio, it is Calle Caliari. When you click on that, you will be taken to a map showing where this calle will be found.

Continue to do this for the remainder of the selections listed for Venice, ending with Sant’Elena, and you’ll discover that not all of them have numbers going that high.

To find out where I took these photos, you’d either have to go to each of the places you have found, or use another site that is a bit more demanding, but which allows you to take a virtual saunter through your nominated location(s). I shan’t burden you with the details of using this site!

http://maps.veniceconnected.it/en 

So here’s what I found, near number 2761.

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15 Comments

Filed under Venice

15 responses to “It’s not very far from number 2761, but in which sestiere?

  1. Bert

    I’d hate to force anyone to do anything they didn’t want to do, but everyone should read 95 Theses 95.

    Like

  2. It was in winter, so relatively quiet there, Caroline!

    I’m so pleased that Garrison is a semi-international star! (Kinda like you, after that photo on Phil’s blog! You look terrific.)

    That’s annoying about the Explorer site .. we’ll blame your laptop, Caroline.

    Like

  3. Caroline

    Ah, the party palace! Occasionally, even here, we can hear the music from there – and count ourselves lucky not to live next door! Were they setting up for or clearing up after a ‘do’ when you got in?

    I also enjoyed Garrison Keillor when he was on BBC Radio 4 in the ?80s/late 90s and subsequently his books became best-sellers in Britain. I still use the phrase “stoned on dinner” 🙂

    Frustratingly, I find Venice Explorer almost unusable – either my computer hangs for ever trying to into it, or if I do get all the way, I don’t get a map. I assume it must be the fault of my ancent laptop 😦

    Like

  4. Jan Graham

    That site has solved many a argument for mee over the years,

    Like

  5. Andrew

    The patterned paving is beautiful.

    Like

  6. Amazingly I tried one of those mapping sites for my address here and it actually gave me a picture of the front of my apartment building. It was right on. Not Google maps though….haven’t tried them for this address. They could not find my previous address at all.
    I love Garrison Keillor. My friends in Eden Prairie, Minnesota claim there is no such place as Lake Wobegon. I tell them they just haven’t looked hard enough. I want to visit Bertha’s Kitty Boutique.
    One of the local Public Radio stations still carries his show on Saturday nights.
    Your site I’m bookmarking for my trip.

    Like

  7. Bert

    Have you read “Lake Wobegon Days” by Garrison Keillor? In which he explains why Lake Wobegon was omitted from the map due to the incompetence of surveyors”.

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    • Oh, Garrison Keillor, I do like him! I wouldn’t have thought that he would have appeared on the radar in your country, Bert. (Yes, I’ve got that book on the shelf, in fact. Time to read it again, perhaps.)

      Like

  8. JoanneH

    I am taking a class of using google maping and world maps for a class at Brown Univ. and having a horrid time with Long\Lat. The ones given for my house is appx 15 miles east of its actual location. I guess google has not made it to my boondock residence I see how the early explorers went so far wrong in many cases, this will be a great excerise for me.

    Like

    • What an excellent class to take, Joanne.

      You’re so right, I look at countries like yours, Canada and Australia and wonder how in the world they could ever have been explored without all our modern devices.

      Like

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