Another broken promise and an explanation

In February during my last visit to Venice, I saw this shrine site, on the wall of the Arsenale, Campo della  Tana. The shrine itself had been removed for restoration.

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According to the sign, the restoration work was to have begun in December 2012, and was due to be completed by the end of March 2013. (The estimated cost was 7.904,11 euro. I’d like Peter, if he happens to read this, to give one of his considered breakdowns for this estimate.)

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Well, I went back at the end of March, the end of April and also on 14 May, the day I left Venice. Needless to say, the site looked exactly as it did when I first saw it in February.

If anyone is going to Venice in the near future, I’d love an update on this situation. IF the restored shrine is back, a photo would be appreciated.

PS: I have had an answer from Daniela, Italian teacher extraordinaire, re the name “calderer”:

Calderer is a person who makes big pots to boil food (and in the past also the laundry). These pots are called “caldaie” in Italian so the name calderer comes from the name of the pots.
The final “-er” is the same as in English: writ-er (the person who write), etc. (I can’t remember other examples, but I’m sure you have a lot). In Venetian dialect (and in other Italian dialects) there are many words of people who make a job that end in -er. Maybe you know the word “bechèr”, the Venetian word for butcher, or “caleghèr” (shoemaker).
You know that in Venice a lot of calle have the name of the job that people made in that area.
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16 Comments

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16 responses to “Another broken promise and an explanation

  1. Brava seductivevenice, a perfect example 🙂

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  2. Hi, seductivevenice. Is that in the area near La Fenice? And, frezzeria is yet another trade, arrow makers, I think.

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  3. Here’s one to add to the list: luganegher, one who makes sausage. There’s a Corte del Luganegher in the Frezzeria district of Venice, where the sausage maker lived (and where Casanova rented a room for a while.)

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  4. Thanks to you, Yvonne, for publishing my answer. I hope it’s helpful for all the lovely readers of this wonderful blog 🙂

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  5. Karen…thanx for the update….Yes good to know the work is completed. (I’m waiting for the restoration of campanile on Torcello to be completed.)

    Yvonne…I also love the area exposed by the vacancy of the shrine….I’ve always loved the backs of things…the innards etc. The walls in Fortuny have some exposed areas that are gorgeous…really inspiring!!

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    • I was reading an article about Torcello a while back. It sounds like the Basilica is in desperate need of funding to conserve the floor, among other things. Unless some wealthy individual (or a group) comes to the rescue, we may not ever again climb that campanile.

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  6. Karen

    The shrine restoration is complete. They must have put the rush on it because of Biennale, that shrine is just a bit down from the main entrance door to Arsenale where many big exhibitions are. I watched the man doing the restoration work for several days restoring the marble supports, which he did with a tiny paintbrush. Actually, the price seems reasonable to me considering what anything costs in Venice, and that it takes special experts to do this kind of work. I will take a photo for you in the next day or two.
    Thanks to Daniela for the explanations, and to Yvonne for passing them on.

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    • That’s really good news, Karen, I’m glad they did get it done in pretty good time.

      I saw a young woman working on a statue of St. Anthony when I was in the Frari cloisters. It sure did look like painstaking work. That was supposed to be ready for his name day, I think it’s in June..

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  7. Ah, ha…in English a “Cauldron”…..like witches would stir their brew in….or my great grandmother would be bent over every Monday….doing the laundry!
    I’ll have to check that shrine in December. I’m thinking that is a really high price for restoration of something that seems small. No wonder so many palazzos are in a bad state.

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  8. Hi Yvonne, I’ll be there in September and will check it out for you.

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  9. Andrew

    Remind me to check in November Yvonne. Thanks for the calderer info.

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