Castello 5691

During a previous visit to Venice, I found a small booklet titled  Venice: Venetian Domestic Architecture, by Egle Trincanato and edited by Renzo Salvadori.

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This work covers the two sestieri (districts) of Castello and Dorsoduro, and focuses on buildings of the 12th to the 18th centuries. These are not grand palazzi, but down to earth homes, of ordinary Venetians.

I have located quite a few of these dwellings, and will share them with you, from time to time.

Some have been changed so radically that you would never recognise them as the same building sketched in the booklet. The narrow calli of Venice also pose some challenges in capturing good images.

The first one I visited is on Salizzada S Lio, 5691. The author comments that this home would have been from the 13th-14th century.

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The ground floor was probably also occupied by a shop when this little palazzo was built. It is noted that the arch over the alley might suggest there was a similar building on the other side.

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The author mentions the “mullioned” windows, with “Ravenna-type capitals”. Now I know that mullions are the vertical parts of a window, dividing it into parts, and that Ravenna-type capitals are basket shaped.

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What the author failed to mention was the surprise just around the corner, in that alley. When I looked up, I saw a most beautiful window frame, with a decorative glazed finish.

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I wish someone would go up there and clean off the pigeon droppings!

What a treasure

What a treasure

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18 Comments

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18 responses to “Castello 5691

  1. I know this web site gives quality depending articles
    and additional material, is there any other site which offers these kinds of
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  2. Mary Jo Sutton

    We’ll be visiting Venice for the first time March 23-25 and staying in Treviso.
    Would you advise one of those hop on/hop off vaperotto passes? Also, anything interesting in Treviso or a place you like to eat there? Found your blog by chance. So fun and interesting to read!!

    Thanks – St. Louis, MO travelors

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    • For sure the vaporetto passes can be handy, because although Venice is small, there are times when you want to sit down and let the water bus take you. I assume you have found the information about buying these passes? When you arrive in Venice by train from Treviso, stop and gaze at what appears before you, from the train station steps. What an introduction to a city!

      This travel forum has good information about public transport (and other things), just follow the links on each side of the page.

      http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/ShowForum-g187870-i57-Venice_Veneto.html

      Treviso is a beautiful city, and will easily absorb some of your time you are spending in this part of Italy. Here is a link to some information for you:

      http://www.italyheaven.co.uk/veneto/treviso.html

      Have a wonderful time.

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  3. I have to face the fact that I’m basically too lazy to ever write the book, Michelle!

    The original of the accounts of domestic architecture was published in 1948. I’ve seen copies of it (in Italian) in the Libreria Toletto. (For about 30 euro.)The extract which I have is a truncated version, and was about 11 euro.

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  4. That book was indeed a find. I just searched Barnes and Noble and they don’t have a new copy available but…you can get used copies ranging in price from $321.96 to $393.99.
    Must be a collector’s item. Guard your little book well, Yvonne.

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  5. That book was a real find Yvonne! Thanks for sharing this with us.

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  6. If someone will let me in I’ll scrub that pigeon pooh off the shutters when I’m there. I need to track that down.
    I love all of your hidden treasures you share with us.
    And put me on the list for an autographed copy of your book too!

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  7. I saw that window the last time I was in Venice, but I didn’t know anything about that building. I think I’ll buy that book too. Thank you 😉

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  8. Yvonne…the hidden treasure is so striking!! It’s interesting that the author failed to mention it….but once again..there are so many treasures in Venice that it is difficult to take them all in. I can walk down the same calle a dozen times and see dozens of new things each time!!
    Your little booklet is a treasure hunt!!
    It’s so wonderful following your adventures!!!

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    • Hi, Linda. It’s nice to have something to give me a bit of focus, instead of the random wandering. many of the Dorsoduro houses are right near Campo Santa Margherita, which makes it easy to stop for a spritz!

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  9. Barb

    Sooner or later we’re going to see a book written by our Yvonne!! I will want an autographed copy, please.

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  10. I think Rapunzel lives there!

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  11. Andrew

    Lovely. I wonder what the little room above the arch is like.

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