Architectural details in Venice

There’s always something to catch your eye, as you walk in Venice.

I wonder what these metal supports did, in their past lives?

 

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10 Comments

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10 responses to “Architectural details in Venice

  1. Michelle

    My new camera is going to be put to very good use. Did you see Italian Notebook yesterday?? Unfortunately those flower boxes won’t be so bright in November/December but I’ll still have these lovely archetectural details and with that 42x zoom I should be able to get things I just couldn’t see in previous pictures.
    165 days…and counting!
    Lovely shots, Bella Yvonne.

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  2. I think, when I next go back, I’ll concentrate on the varied numbers we see around Venice. They’re everywhere!

    (We’ll never know if you’d win your bet, Bert.)

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  3. Bert

    I would take a bet that ‘1854’ is the year that the ironwork was put in place – and the initials those of the owner. Probably not the year that the house was built. But there are plenty of houses where you can see traces of old numbers – not the Roman numerals, but numbers similar to the present ones. Palazzo Surian Bellotto on the Fondamenta di Cannaregio, for instance, which is now Cannaregio 967, but was once 1094.

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  4. I just noticed that the house at the bottom has two different numbers….
    I love all the details….every square foot of Venice is full of surprises.

    I would love to go back in time…..spend a day in the 1700’s….or 1600’s or even the 1800’s………..we can dream!!

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    • It’s sort of frustrating, Linda. You notice something like those 2 different numbers (and also the initials) on that doorway, and there’s just no way to solve the mystery.

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  5. I apparently have been walking around with blinders on, yet again.

    Grazie Cara for another eye-opening experience!

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  6. That’s for sure, and to talk to the craftsmen who did all of the extraordinary work.

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  7. Don’t you wish you could go back in time and find out what it all was for and why it was built that way?

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