Where was I?

Who can work out where these photos were taken?  It was an interesting day, again.

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36 Comments

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36 responses to “Where was I?

  1. Caroline

    I’ve just got round to looking at the website for the America’s Cup events here. The spaces numbered 2-8 (or maybe 9) seem to equate to the ‘Arsenale Novissima’ area used in the last 2 Art Biennales, but only open until about the July as I recall. Some of the garden NE of there was open too but not all of it, I think – I’m sure we didn’t come across a football pitch! (Although if we had, would we have thought it was art? 🙂 )

    You could enter either via the rather exciting walk along the metal walkway on the outside of the Arsenale walls from the Celestia boat stop, then down through some sort of giant workshop, or get a boat across from the ‘official’ Arsenale area. Or possibly through the NE gardens from Bacini, last time – we weren’t sure so didn’t try it.

    It looks as if for the AC there’s also a route open to the public up the west side, where we haven’t been. Not sure if we’ll give it a go or not – I assumed it would cost quite a bit, especially seeing that everything seems to involve being guided, but the website doesn’t seem to mention any prices.

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    • Yes, I’ll bet there’ll be euros involved during the AC events! I recall walking along that metal walkway to the Bacini vaporetto stop. I wish I had paid more attention to what was inside the building instead of fretting that I’d have to retrace my steps!

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  2. Hi, Daniel

    They were all taken inside the Arsenale, during the past art Biennale. The first photo is part of the Corderie, the others are from deeper within the complex. There’s a big, sprawly, tangled garden back there, among other things.

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  3. Hi Yvonne,
    great pixs. #1 Scuola Nova della Misericordia? #2 Arsenale? I’m very curious about #5, but I have no clue.

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  4. MaryK

    Best to not speak about the Australian Pavilion Yvonne……. At the last Architecture Biennale it was cringe-worthy.

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  5. Your photos of the Arsenale ~~~yes, we knew 😉 ~~~ brought back memories of our visit last October. We especially enjoyed the designated “Italian” venue, sooo many “epresentations” of the Italian flag in the art, loved it! Across the bridge, and a stone’s throw from “the lions” is our now traditional “Biennale lunch stop” Paolo’s at Campo d’ Arsenale. We visit the Giardini in the morning, then do lunch (pizza, wine, tiramisu & espresso) and then head to the Arsenale. Depending on whether or not Randallo has a load of books, a leisurly stroll back across the city (stopping for a spritz or 2) back to the home base. As the song goes: Thanks for the memories. ❤

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    • Caroline

      Blimey, Sheila, you must have a lot more stamina than us! We find we need a day and a half for the Giardini (a day for all the national pavilions & half a day for the central pavilion), and last year spent 2 days at the Arsenale without even managing all of the Novissima area!!

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      • There sure is a lot to take in, Caroline, just in the two big areas. I was so disappointed in the Australian pavilion, but maybe it had more in it, earlier in the Biennale???

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    • Hi, Sheila. I thought someone would recognise some of the art work. There was a heck of a lot of it, inside and out, eh?

      You folks had a most satisfying visit to the last Biennale, didn’t you?

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      • Yes we did, and we got to view some of the venues outside of the formal ($$) Biennale areas, a thrill to see some palaces that are not normally open to the general public. 😉 Alot of profound work, alot of whimsy, my own personal share of “I don’t understand it” and “good grief, that is crap, what were they thinking, is there no other artist in (fill in the blank country) to be a representative?

        @Caroline, we were on a mission, with research ahead of time, we knew what we wanted to see, and plotted out the day to include the lunch (vap from Lido was overcrowded, it was unseasonably hot, so we wandered on foot, continued the search for the favorite spritz !

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  6. MaryK

    Absolutely always worth a day of wandering if you get the chance to visit the Arsenale. The wild garden area at the very back is one of the most enchanting places – and every time I’ve been there it’s been absolutely empty.

    I’m thrilled that even more is opening up for this year’s Biennale.

    I saw the other day that the areas in the Arsenale that they’ve got open for next weeks America’s Cup yacht racing are a lot different from the areas they’ve used for the Biennale in recent years – so maybe some of these are the new areas Caroline mentions.

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    • G’day, Mary! I was so (pleasantly) surprised with the parts we we allowed to walk through. That garden would be such a good spot to sit and read, or just think deep and meaningful thoughts!

      Sig. Nonloso [ http://veneziablog.blogspot.com/ ] does some rowing, and the boats are kept in one part of the Arsenale, so he has access to another corner.

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  7. Caroline

    Yvonne, you were teasing me when you let me witter on about being here for the Biennale! For some reason I’d thought you’d only been here in the winter?

    Anyway, as you may already know, yet more of the Arsenale is opening up for the various Biennali, starting with the Architecture one this year! There were a couple of pieces in La Repubblica last week, one confirming that next year’s inaugural Vatican pavilion for the Art Biennale will be in this newly restored space – the Sala d’Armi I think it was.

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    • Hi, Caroline. I had a few days before all of the Biennale closed its doors. But, not many of the venues were still open when I got there.

      If you haven’t got your camera by the time more of the Arsenale is open, I swear I’m going to do a Walk-a-thon to raise money for a new one! 🙂

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      • Caroline

        🙂

        3 years ago we thought the most interesting stuff was in the ‘Arsenale Novissima’ (which was only open until about July, I think), but last year we didn’t even get round all of that! The Edinburgh contemporary art group we were in always visited the Biennale in October, despite us trying to point out that a lot of interesting stuff has finished by then. We stuck to June – more art and better weather 🙂 It may be easier to fit more in when it’s not hot, though.

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      • You’ll be able to see so much this year, and go back to places, if you want to, Caroline

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  8. I’d better let you all know, these were all taken at the Arsenale, during Biennale. The first photo is in the splendid part where they made the rope (the Corderie) http://vimeo.com/40891758

    It would be a dream come true, to have a guided tour through this complex, which was such an important part of the history of Venice.

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  9. Bert

    No, Yvonne, I was really guessing, but guessing seriously. I haven’t got a clue where any of those photos were taken. As they are mostly interiors, I can’t check on veniceconnected. I thought the Number 5 might be that isolated church tower at the north of the island.

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  10. Bert

    Is Number 5 on Mazzorbo?
    Are Number 1 and Number 2 in the newly opened Dogana gallery?
    Were some of the others taken on your day out in Mestre?

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  11. 1. Post office. 2. recycling plant. 3. grandma’s house after the big bad wolf’s visit. 4. gondola heaven – there are no canals there, hence the wheels. 5. entry to your appt. 6. display at a shopping mall. 7. setting for Chariot of the Gods movie.

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  12. Biennale…..do you want something more specific??
    I love the gondola cart…..lol.

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  13. I love that ramshackle wooden fence. It looks like the entrance to a hobbit village.

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  14. That’s a good try, Michelle. Someone will soon get it!

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  15. Michelle

    Hmmm…somewhere in the Giardinni…
    really, I have no idea.

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