My little squatter

I chanced to look up at a wall in the back corridor of my house, and saw evidence of a visitor while I had been away for several months.

The first photo shows what I saw, from a safe distance.

This warranted closer inspection, so armed with a step-stool and camera, I zoomed in for this shot.

It was the nest of a mud-dauber wasp, and 2 of the 3 chambers were open and empty. I’ve often seen them outside, this was my first experience with them inside my house.

They’re quite fascinating insects, read about them in this link. They are welcome to share my life, as they do get rid of a few spiders for me!

http://www.ozanimals.com/Insect/Mud-Dauber-Wasp/Sceliphron%20/sp.html

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18 Comments

Filed under Atherton

18 responses to “My little squatter

  1. We had a nest like that on our curtains here in Mexico.

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  2. Craig Bleakley

    So, um, where’d the mud come from?
    You strike me as a better housekeeper than to have lots of mud lying about. But I’ve been wrong before.

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  3. Bert

    You might be fascinated to know that the figure (0.45359237) was decided upon, rather than being determined experimentally, to make it exactly divisible by 7, because there are 7000 grains in a pound. This means that an exact metric decimal equivalent for 1 grain can be made (0.06479891 g) rather than a recurring decimal. Obviously, experiments were done to find a very close approximation, but someone decided that 8 significant figures was near enough.

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  4. julie

    I agree with Michele .. could not live with a wasps nest in the house euwww !
    I also studied the Merchant of Venice 5 years ago at my evening class, one of the reasons I had to visit Venice, my favourite Shakespeare play (as well as Othello) I had the part of Jessica in our readings. love the Al Pacino film of this !

    Yvonne … thanks for you good wishes xxxx

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    • The thing was, I had lived with it for a few days, until I glanced up. I sometimes see those wasps in the house, there are no screens on the windows in many houses, including mine.

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  5. Hmm, I should do a post on “a gecko wearing thongs at sunset, gazing at a pissotta”, perhaps.

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  6. Michelle

    I also had to learn Portia’s speach…remember the first line (I had many more to memorize after that …I was in drama in high school).
    Wasps in the house! Not sure I would want that…I’d rather have gheckos…but not when they are selling insurance (sorry probably only the people in the US get that reference).

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  7. Somehow, the metric version doesn’t scan so well, Bert. 🙂

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  8. Bert

    I had to learn Portia’s speech about 50 years ago – and I can still remember most of it:
    The quality of mercy is not strain’d,
    It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath.
    etc
    The Merchant of Venice is where we get our ‘pound of flesh’ expression from. Of course, these days, we’d have to say ‘our 0.45359237 of a kilogram of flesh’

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  9. Ma Nature is wonderful, if we just leave her to get on with it, eh?

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  10. They’re fantastic architects! I also had a nest in the bathroom, but quite a different structure.

    So, you probably have that speech memorised too! I especially relate to this line: “With mirth and laughter let old wrinkle come”

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    • Melissa

      Oh yes, I’m saying that speech in my sleep!

      I was wondering what all chickens were pecking at the other day then realised they were breaking open the mud nests to eat the larvae. They were positioned down low on an outside chair.

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  11. Melissa

    They’re fast little builders aren’t they? I have quite a few here, didn’t know that about the spiders though!

    Everything is Venice here at the moment, Liam is studying Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. This is the speech that I have had to listen to everyday for the past week until he learnt it off by heart:

    Let me play the fool.
    With mirth and laughter let old wrinkle come,
    and let my liver rather heat with wine
    Than my heart cool with mortifying groans.
    Why should a man whose blood warm within
    Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?
    Sleep when he wakes? And creep into the jaundice
    By being peevish? I tell thee, Antonio
    (I love thee, and ‘tis my love that speaks):
    There are a sort of men whose visages
    Do cream and mantle like a standing pond
    And do a willful stillness entertain
    With purpose to be dressed in an opinion
    Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit,
    As who should say “I am sir Oracle
    And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark.”
    O my Antonio, I do know of these
    That therefore only are reputed wise
    For saying nothing, when, I am sure,
    If they should speak, would almost damn those ears
    Which, hearing them, would call their brothers
    Fools.
    I’ll tell thee more of this another time.
    But fish not with this melancholy bait
    For this fool gudgeon, this opinion.-
    Come, good Lorenzo.-Fare you well a while.
    I’ll end my exhortation after dinner.

    I think he thinks it is cool only for the reason that his Dad’s name gets a mention!

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