Stones tell a story, if we know how to listen

A slow walk down a back calle, to catch the San Marcuola vaporetto revealed these:

 

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14 Comments

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14 responses to “Stones tell a story, if we know how to listen

  1. Daniel

    Your pictures made me hit the books! Thanks!

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  2. Thank you Daniel, (and Bert and Randy), for filling in the details. Now, I’ll have to go back again to look with educated eyes! And, thank you for explaining about the scuola, also. It is an eye-catching building.

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  3. Next to San Marcuola is Ca’ Memmo-Martinengo and across from San Marcuola is Scuola del Cristo built in 1644. I think that Fortunato is the guy with the book. Saints Ermagora and Fortunato were pals; one is usually shown with the staff and the other with a book. It all makes sense. Thanks Yvonne for posting these pictures. They are new to me. You are such a great observer!

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  4. Hi, FS. have you had any more earth tremors? Hmm, I don’t know whether to believe the “humble” bit. 😉

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  5. Sono di Chicago

    It’s so rewarding to be tagging along with such a keen observer, someone who does indeed know how to listen to those stones. Oh, it’s also a bit humbling (how many times have I walked by some of this stuff without even noticing it?).

    I can only hope your sharpened senses are somehow contagious. Thanks yet again.

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  6. Do you think anything built now will last half as long as the bits you show us?

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  7. Wonderful: “The eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.” Henri Bergson. St. Hermagora, of course is 1/2 of the Ermagora and Fortunato (apparantly not so fortunate) that were “contracted” to make Marcuola. The church was originally founded in about 569! Bravo!

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  8. Bert

    The fourth photo is the stemma of the Memmo family, which supplied Marcantonio Memmo as Doge from 1612-1615. The objects that look like upside-down wine glasses are, apparently, citrons ( cedri).
    St Hermagoras is often said to have been the first bishop of Aquileia. I wonder what his image is doing there, on the front of that house, and how old it might be.

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  9. Another lovely walk! I am strolling alongside when I read your posts! Grazie!

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