Florence: Torre dei Marsili

In the 11th and 12th centuries, Florence was getting richer and richer. Many families were fighting against one another, so they started to build house towers which could be easily defended, and could provide a means of escape, via passages that lead from one (friendly) tower to another.

There are still a number of these towers to be found in Florence. This is just one of them, easily found and admired. It features a knock-out ceramic Annunciation above one door.

The apartment where I’ll be staying is also in one of the remaining towers, but it’s not quite as posh as this one.  (I’ve put a photo of that tower at the end of the post.)
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This is where I’ll be staying: Torre Ramaglianti

rama

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21 Comments

Filed under Florence, Uncategorized

21 responses to “Florence: Torre dei Marsili

  1. Fascinating – are any of the passages still in place? You may be able to welcome your prince via underground rather then by risking your hair :) Have a wonderful time in Florence.

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    • I think they were made of wood, so I doubt I’ll find any passages. I’ll keep my eyes open, though.

      I am so looking forward to new discoveries and challenges, Debbie.

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  2. That is indeed a beautiful Annunciation!
    How long will you be staying? Time to let your hair grow lady.;-)

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  3. Pat

    I’ll have to look for these while I’m in Florence in September!

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    • There are quite a few along Borgo San Jocopo, Pat. The Torre dei Marsili should be easy to spot with that spectacular Annunciation.

      Are you going to Puglia? Have a wonderful time.

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  4. Will you be letting your hair down from there in case an Italian prince passes by…?

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  5. Florence is not as well known — at least to me — for its towers as other cities are, so looking forward to more on these!

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    • I’ve stopped counting the number that are listed and described. It’s going to become mission impossible, I reckon! It’s wonderful that we can access this sort of material online. I just wish I could remember it all …

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      • That’s the joy of enthusiastic and inspiring blogs such as yours, packed with photos, little historical snippets and other details, that form a welcome subtitute for the real thing until one hopefully visits for oneself!

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        • That’s such an encouraging thing to say, thank you!

          (Have you mastered the new format on WordPress? I like surprises, but not this sort.)

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        • Well deserved, I must add!

          The new format: still a little confused and lost, and the old format still appears except when I’m editing an old post, but no doubt I’ll get used to it. I did find the old format was developing irritating glitches, so perhaps a redesign was called for.

          Liked by 1 person

  6. So lovely. Your pictures are amazing.

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  7. Oh, Daniel, I can hardly wait to get back there, and just indulge in all the visible art. What a city!

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  8. One of the most beautiful Annunciations that I’ve seen.
    Thanks for posting it Yvonne.
    Daniel

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